Chestnut Chocolate Cupcakes with White Frosting

You know what other ingredient is amazing for fall? Chestnuts! Nutty and warm glorious chestnuts! And when paired with chocolate? Taste buds are blown. You may think of Christmas when you hear chestnuts, but they are actually available starting in September through the autumn months. Besides, if Christmas decorations are already out (not kidding) then chestnuts can be sprinkled all around too! But they are very much indeed a fall flavor.

Paleo Chocolate Chestnut Cupcakes with White Frosting

The flavor of chestnut flour screams autumn and there are many ingredients that pair nicely with chestnut’s sweet and nutty taste. Vanilla, honey, nutmeg, and chocolate of course. A cupcake featuring all these flavors are just pure heaven. You think they’ll make a chestnut chocolate latte sometime? No matter, this cupcake is better anyway if I do say so myself.

Paleo Chocolate Chestnut Cupcakes with White Frosting

Actually, I’ve had the urge to bake with chestnut flour for some time. They are quite unique and unlike any of the other nut flours. I admit to having a mild concern about heating naked nuts to such heat. What’s interesting about chestnuts is that they comprise mostly starches, some fiber, protein, and very little fats. So, chestnut flour appears to be more stable at higher temperatures than almond flour. I see that as an ideal baking ingredient and I’m definitely going to play with it this season. They do sing about chestnuts roasting on an open fire!

Paleo Chocolate Chestnut Cupcakes with White Frosting

I carefully selected the ideal ratio of the chestnut flour to chocolate through a little bit of trial and error. Chestnut flour is pretty loud but the level of chocolate I’ve chosen balances nicely without either ingredient overpowering. The sweetness isn’t too high either, which makes it a great breakfast muffin without any frosting. I have no problem eating a nutty chocolate cake for breakfast!

I spent a lot of time thinking about what frosting would go well with this cake. Since the cake has a prominent flavor of chocolate and chestnut, I didn’t want a strong frosting to impart away from the cake. I figured a simple white frosting was the best choice.

Paleo Chocolate Chestnut Cupcakes with White Frosting

With warm tones of chestnut and familiar joy of chocolate, the mini cake makes a wonderful addition to the fall table!

Chestnut Chocolate Cupcakes
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Paleo chocolate chestnut cupcakes with white frosting. Yield: 6 jumbo cupcakes or 12 regular cupcakes.
Author:
Serves: 12
Ingredients
For the Chestnut Chocolate Cupcakes
  • 6 Tablespoons of Coconut Oil (soft)
  • ½ cup (168g) of Honey
  • 1 cup (130g) of Chestnut Flour
  • ½ cup (60g) of Cocoa Powder
  • 6 Eggs
  • ¼ cup of Full Fat Coconut Milk
  • 1 teaspoon of Vanilla Extract
  • ½ teaspoon of Nutmeg
  • ½ teaspoon of Salt
  • ½ teaspoon of Baking Soda
  • ½ teaspoon of Cream of Tartar
For the White Frosting
  • ½ cup of Palm Shortening
  • ¾ cup of Raw Wildflower Honey (or other honey that is liquid at room temperature)
  • ⅓ cup of Arrowroot Starch, sifted
  • ½ teaspoon of Almond Extract
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350F. Grease the muffin tin or line with cupcake paper.
  2. Beat the coconut oil and honey on high speed until creamy. If the mixture is greasy, chill in the freezer for a few minutes.
  3. Sift together the chestnut flour, cocoa powder, salt, nutmeg, baking soda, and cream of tartar into a bowl.
  4. Whisk together the eggs, vanilla, and coconut milk in a separate bowl to from the liquid mixture.
  5. Pour half of the liquid mixture into the mixing bowl of the creamed coconut oil and honey.
  6. Beat until combined.
  7. Add half of the dry mixture and beat until combined.
  8. Add the rest of the liquid, beat, and add the rest of they dry ingredients. Scrape the sides.
  9. Beat on high for about 30 seconds.
  10. Evenly distribute the batter into each muffin tin cup.
  11. Bake at 350F for 20-23 minutes, until an inserted toothpick comes out clean.
  12. Let cool in the tin for 10 minutes. Gently remove the cake from the tin and let cool to room temperature before frosting.
For the White Frosting
  1. Whip together the honey and shortening until creamy.
  2. Add the sifted arrowroot starch, almond extract, and salt.
  3. Slowly whip until the starch is mixed in with the creamed honey and shortening.
  4. Whip on high until fluffy.
  5. Dollop frosting on cooled cupcakes and enjoy!

 

Sharon’s Notes

  • I use local Boston raw and unfiltered wildflower honey, which is a thick syrup at room temperature. I noticed that honeys vary wildly, and a lot are solid at room temperature. You may gently heat solid honey to a syrup consistency. Also you can use maple syrup in place of honey too!
  • The cupcakes, including the frosting, are best at room temperature.
  • Vanilla can easily be used in place of almond extract for the frosting.

Paleo Chocolate Chestnut Cupcakes with White Frosting

 

Trackbacks

  1. […] 16. Chestnut Chocolate Cupcakes These cupcakes are made in a way that makes them a little different than every other cupcake recipe we’ve seen, because they use chestnuts. These are not your typical nut like almonds or walnuts which we often see in baking recipes. It gives these a unique flavor that manages to hold its ground even with all the chocolate in play. The frosting gets its sweetness from honey, way better than the High Fructose Corn Syrup that you’ll find in conventional store bought frosting. It also uses a healthy form of oil, unlike the kind you’ll find in commercial brands of frosting. […]

  2. […] 16. Chestnut Chocolate Cupcakes These cupcakes are made in a way that makes them a little different than every other cupcake recipe we’ve seen, because they use chestnuts. These are not your typical nut like almonds or walnuts which we often see in baking recipes. It gives these a unique flavor that manages to hold its ground even with all the chocolate in play. The frosting gets its sweetness from honey, way better than the High Fructose Corn Syrup that you’ll find in conventional store bought frosting. It also uses a healthy form of oil, unlike the kind you’ll find in commercial brands of frosting. […]

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